31 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Nothing beats a futuristic hilltop home overlooking canyons, mountains and the bright lights of Los Angeles. At least that was the case for Beats...
31 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Psy and other K-pop icons have requested an autopsy for legendary South Korean rocker Shin Hae Chul, who died on Monday following an operation,...
31 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Try not to cry at these emotional series finale set pics from the "Sons of Anarchy" cast.
31 October, 2014 - MTV.com
"Scandal" has the perfect response to anyone thinking about slurring a woman.
31 October, 2014 - RollingStone.com
Bruce Springsteen's first children's book Outlaw Pete, based on a character introduced in the Working on a Dream song of the same name, is due out November 4th, and the songwriter-turned-author spoke to the New York Times about his own favorite books and writers. The 10 Best Bruce Springsteen Deep Cuts Springsteen's literary tastes are varied, as we learn the E Street rocker's bookshelves are filled with everything from cosmology and philosophy books to hard-boiled crime novels, Gabriel García Márquez's Love in the Time of Cholera and former New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera's autobiography. "I like the Russians, the Chekhov short stories, Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky. I never read any of them until the past four years, and found them to be thoroughly psychologically modern," Springsteen said. As for his current favorites, the rocker lists authors Richard Ford, Cormac McCarthy and Philip Roth, a fellow New Jersey native. Given the often dark, unforgiving nature of those authors' novels, it's clear where Springsteen's inspiration as a writer comes from. As the Rock & Roll Hall of Famer said of his book back in August, "Outlaw Pete is essentially the story of a man trying to outlive and outrun his sins," which is heavy material for a children's story, even if the main character is a bank-robbing baby. The story will also include memorable personalities from throughout the Springsteen songbook. In the interview, we learn that Springsteen wrote his 1995 single "The Ghost of Tom Joad" before he even read John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, the novel in which Joad is the protagonist; Springsteen was initially inspired by both Woody Guthrie's "The Ballad of Tom Joad" and director John Ford's cinematic adaptation than the Steinbeck novel itself. Springsteen also admits that Steinbeck's East of Eden is the novel he's most embarrassed to not have read yet. If Springsteen ever plans on writing his own life story – like so many rockers before him – he's setting his own bar high. "As far as memoirs, it's hard to beat Keith Richards' love of music that shines through in Life," he said. "I also found Eric Clapton's autobiography to be surprisingly revealing and very moving. Of course I loved Bob Dylan's Chronicles. It made me proud to be a musician." Rolling Stone contributing editor Greil Marcus' Mystery Train: Images of America in Rock 'n' Roll Music was also selected as Springsteen's favorite book about music. Related 10 Amazing Songs Springsteen Cut From 'Born in the U.S.A.' Bruce Springsteen to Headline 'Stand Up for Heroes' Bruce Springsteen Releasing Remastered LP Box Set
31 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Jonathan Jackson + Enation Jonathan Jackson, 32, has basked in the entertainment spotlight for more than 20 years: he joined ABC's General Hospital...
31 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Chris Brown gives ATL rapper OG Maco a big look with his crazy Instagram video.
31 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Benedict Cumberbatch's audition tape for the part of Smaug in "The Hobbit" makes it clear why he scored the role.
31 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Nicki Minaj might have just pushed The Pinkprint back to Dec. 15, but she's got a new teaser as a consolation prize. It's short, although if you've...
31 October, 2014 - RollingStone.com
In my New York City high school in the late Seventies, the black kids listened to funk and disco, the white kids to Sixties rock and new wave — music that reflected back who we imagined ourselves to be. Then there were the musical theater kids, another race entirely, devoted to songs built on a different science, to develop characters and advance stage narrative. They were adorable, but song for song, generally insufferable. Being James Brown: Rolling Stone's 2006 Story This triangulation figures in The Fortress of Solitude, the endearing adaptation of Jonathan Lethem's music-geeky novel about 1970s Brooklyn that's currently running at New York's Public Theater. It also figures in a notable aesthetic shift where musical theater is finally — thank God — engaging more deeply with modern pop, both mainstream and indie. The trend is obviously demographic-driven – boomers and Gen X-ers are aging into theater-goers/-makers, combined with the collapse of the record business. Following in the footsteps of rock-minded forebears like Hair, Jesus Christ Superstar and Rent, this more-or-less began in 2006 with alt-lite singer/songwriter Duncan Sheik dialing back the usual Broadway cheese on the hit Spring Awakening, and it's given way to some remarkably cool musicals. Literary indie-rocker Stew (of The Negro Problem) took his Passing Strange to Broadway in 2008, an autobiographical song cycle that had him onstage both narrating and killing it with his band; it was so good, Spike Lee filmed it. A year later, with Brooklyn afrobeat acolytes Antibalas in tow, the brilliant Fela! also hit Broadway, thanks to boosting from Questlove and investment from Jay-Z. The unlikely pop-punk American history lesson Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson was inspired, even if its Broadway run tanked; American Idiot was better than it had any right to be, and has toured for years; the U2-enhanced Spiderman: Turn Off The Dark, if nothing else, was a fascinating pop train wreck (see Glen Berger's wild-ride insider tale Song of Spiderman). New-wave hitmaker Cyndi Lauper wrote music and lyrics for Kinky Boots, which is still kicking, as is the authentically glam-rocking Hedwig and the Angry Inch revival. Worthy jukebox musicals like A Night With Janis Joplin, Motown, the modest and surprisingly compelling off-Broadway Lennon, and Tammy Faye Starlite's spot-on, way-off Broadway Nico: Underground skew towards boomers but keep coming. Weaned on the heydays of college radio and early internet free-for-all, the sizable target audience for these shows are clearly willing to pony up for good music. No wonder even non-musicals want a piece: The note-perfect all-star revival of Kenneth Lonergan's early-Eighties sorta-coming-of-age slacker drama This Is Our Youth – a next-gen Broadway salvo if ever there was one, complete with Pitchfork ad campaign — gives Vampire Weekend's Rostam Batmanglij star-font billing, even though his original music, which enlivened bar traffic during intermission, is otherwise underemployed. musical theater is — thank god — finally engaging more with modern pop, both mainstream and indie. All this made the prospect of a Fortress musical promising, as did its opening (after a premiere run in Dallas) at the Public, the forward-looking arts operation launched in 1967 with the world premiere of Hair that went on to incubate Passing Strange. (In addition to Fortress, it's also presenting the most visionary of recent new-school musicals, David Byrne's disco-riffic Here Lies Love.)  On stage as in the novel, the Fortress story centers on the friendship between white, Jewish Dylan Ebdus (played by Adam Chanler-Berat with impressive nerd acumen) and black Mingus Rude (the charismatic, more closet-geeky Kyle Beltran), kids growing up in 1970's Gowanus né Boerum Hill. Dylan's single dad is a visual artist, Abraham (Ken Barnett); Mingus' is a past-his-prime soul singer, Barrett Rude Jr. (a movingly faded Kevin Mambo). Dylan grows up to be a music journalist, while Mingus goes a different route. Their friendship waxes and wanes, complicated by race, drugs, and fate. Music fixations aside, they are also comic geeks, and in one of the work's central metaphors, the pair accesses a non-pharmaceutical superpower. Daniel Aukin's evocative and modest direction lets them employ this gift, suffice to say, without a need to fly over the audience Spiderman-style. But are the songs fly? Sort of. Composer Michael Friedman (Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson) centers the shows sound on the proto-disco Philly soul sound of Barrett Rude Jr. and his fictional group, the Subtle Distinctions. This sets the bar high for vocal performance, which the singers can't quite reach. The material is virtually all written by Friedman, another hurdle, though he has an ear for pop and a knowing attention to detail. Allusions to Al Green's "Take Me To The River", and the Talking Heads cover of it by extension, weave through the show, connecting Mingus' soul roots to the CBGBs-era punk scene Dylan eventually falls in with. Bits of the Heads' "Once In A Lifetime" also bubble up, along with spoken lyric shards and other inside references (i.e., the "don't look back" reprise directed at Dylan, a rap that quotes both the Beastie Boys and Wild Style, etc.). In the most explicit pop song quote, Dylan is chided to the lyrics of Wild Cherry's white-boy-indicting "Play That Funky Music". Later in the show's timeline, the menacing Robert Woolfolk (humanized touchingly by Brian Tyree Henry) begins spitting Biggie-style rhymes over serviceable beats and a Dr. Dre-style mosquito synth signifying gangsta rap, albeit West Coast. The house band is solid, and the pop gestures are artful. But they make you long for the sources. Saul Williams: Why Broadway's Tupac Musical Closed Early That the music falls short of the novel's pop-obsessed ideals recalls another moment in rap history: when copyright lawyers effectively shut down the freewheeling art of hip-hop sampling to all but the highest rollers. Would more of the original Seventies music, even in fragments, have magnified the Fortress experience? No doubt. Would securing rights have ballooned the cost of this modest production? Probably. As more musicians start envisioning musical theater as an opportunity to fill the gaps, creative and fiscal, left by the deflation of the recording industry, it would be great all around if theater composers had a more DJ-like freedom to use pop music. While the lawyers and producers sort that out, I'll keep my fantasy Fortress musical in my head, the one that ends, like the novel, with Dylan driving through the night listening to Brian Eno's Another Green World. Until then, this production will do. Related Bob Marley Musical Opening Off-Broadway Inside Sting's Big Broadway Adventure Jonathan Lethem Defends Eighties Dylan
31 October, 2014 - RollingStone.com
Halloween only rolls around once a year, but that doesn't mean there aren't other occasions — say, a sold-out show in Kansas City, Missouri, during your band's final performance on Keith Urban's Escape Together World Tour — worthy of dressing up in costume and letting your freak flag fly. That's what Taylor Swift did on August 8, 2009, when the singer and three members of her road band stormed the stage during Urban's headlining set, decked out in classic Kiss garb. Taylor Swift Will Headline 'New Year's Rockin' Eve' 2015 Sporting face paint, platform boots, black wigs and spandex pants, the Kiss clones chose their entrance wisely: during the first chorus of Urban's then-current singl, "Kiss a Girl," which had climbed its way up the pop and country charts earlier that summer. They stayed onstage for the remainder of the song, taking super-sized strums on their instruments and even lining up beside Urban for some synchronized dance moves. To emphasize the whole "kiss" theme, they also recruited two backup singers to hit the stage dressed up as super-sized Hersey Kisses. Urban more or less held it together throughout the performance, despite being flanked (and dwarfed) by four towering, tongue-waggling "knights in Satan's service." He even traded a few lyrics with Swift, who had paused her own Fearless Tour — a headlining trek that stretched from April 2009 to July 2010 — to join Urban's crew on the road for a handful of summertime shows. Swift never served as the opening act for another major tour again, and as the performance of "Kiss a Girl" winds to a close in the video below, it's easy to see her hunger for the spotlight. She yanks off her wig as soon as the final chord rings out — just to make sure everyone realizes that the girl who looks exactly like Taylor Swift in Ace Frehley's Spaceman makeup is, in fact, Taylor Swift in Ace Frehley's Spaceman makeup — and lingers onstage while her bandmates exit, unwilling to join them until she speaks to the audience one final time. "We'd like to thank Keith Urban for a great tour!" she shouts into the mic before blowing a kiss to the audience and walking into the wings, looking like she owns the place. Although the fan-shot video ends there, Swift actually returned to the stage again that night, joining Urban's band for a set-closing performance of "Somebody Like You." You can take Taylor off the stage, but you can't take the… well, actually, no, you really can't take Taylor offstage, can you? Related 22 Things You Learn Hanging Out With Taylor Swift Gene Simmons Tells Women to 'Stop Depending on Men' Taylor Swift Whips New York Into a Frenzy on 'GMA'
31 October, 2014 - RollingStone.com
David Guetta's next album, Listen, opens with the sound of a piano. Eventually, a drum kit provides the opening track, "Dangerous," with a crisp beat, and the guitar and bass lock into a disco-funk groove; a few minutes later, a string section brings it all to a close. "I wanted to challenge myself a lot and move out of my comfort zone," the DJ tells Rolling Stone, explaining the origin of this "more emotional" song and LP. "That's why I started with 'Dangerous': It's very electronic, kind of on the French-Dutch vibe, but it's also using a classical music orchestra and acoustic sounds." The 30 Greatest EDM Albums Before releasing the song as a single, however, Guetta recruited a handful of other DJs to create edits more suitable for club play. "I made a remix myself and also had other producers remix it," he says, "because its more about the tempo – it's downtempo for the kind of music I play." Below, hear Steve Aoki's energized take, a four-and-a-half minute remix that kicks in right away, building up to a drop that occurs a minute and a half later. A marching band drum pattern replaces the closing strings. Listen will be released November 3rd on Atlantic/Parlophone and can be pre-ordered here. Related Steve Aoki on the Next Skrillex, the End of Aging David Guetta on Leading EDM's American Takeover David Guetta Partners With the United Nations
31 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Katy Perry's Halloween costume is a teenage dream of another sort: The pop star went to Kate Hudson's Halloween party dressed up as a Cheeto....
31 October, 2014 - NEWS.com.au
TWO retrospective releases take us back in time, to Sydney’s most famous punk pioneers and the thriving live scene that was Carlton in Melbourne.
31 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
R.E.M. may be no more, but the archives haven’t run dry yet. On Nov. 24, fans of the college rock’s gods will have a new treasure trove of goodies...
31 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera totally embody the '90s teen-witch classic film, 'The Craft.' Don't believe us? SEE THE RECEIPTS.
31 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
On this mid-October Friday, San Diego State University's campus looks like a certain kind of college-goer's paradise: guys in flip-flops and their...
31 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Maybe you've heard that Prince (along with 3rdEyeGirl) will be the music guest on Saturday Night Live this weekend. Host Chris Rock...
31 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Make way, Lorde, One Direction, and Fergie: Iggy Azalea is hitting the American Music Awards stage, too. The news arrived Friday morning in a press...
31 October, 2014 - MTV.com
This Halloween, "Game of Thrones" costumes get judged by one man who really knows his stuff.
31 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Three measures on the ballots in Illinois, Washington and Alabama on Tuesday (November 4) will ask voters to make important choices about firearm laws.
Hip-Hop / Pop / R & B
Inglese
totale 100 video
creata di MusicPlayOn
ascoltata 769,427 volte
09:09:56
Pop / Hip-Hop / Dance
Inglese
totale 50 video
creata di MusicPlayOn
ascoltata 597,827 volte
03:25:44
Pop / Rock / Hip-Hop
Inglese / Giapponese / Altro
totale 100 video
creata di MusicPlayOn
ascoltata 156,843 volte
10:23:16
Pop / Dance / R & B
Inglese / Altro / Spagnola
totale 200 video
creata di Fric53
ascoltata 105,793 volte
15:42:48
Dance / Rock / House
Inglese
totale 7 video
creata di frikacc
ascoltata 99,192 volte
00:26:08
R & B
Inglese
totale 11 video
creata di TheMusicManiac
ascoltata 53,348 volte
00:40:02